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As a resume specialist, I certainly understand that it would be great to wake up thrilled at the prospect of going to work every day. However, for the majority this is simply not a reality – and that’s OK.

On the flip side, it’s NOT OK to wake up every day and dread going to work.

For many, if the pros of the role outweigh the cons, then the role is likely a decent fit – for now. But, these cons might be signs that it’s time for a new career.

When it comes to writing a resume, I see many candidates struggle with deciding how far back to go, what to include, and what not to include as part of your career history. As an executive resume writer, I’m an advocate of devoting the majority of the “real estate” on your resume to what happened in the past 15 years.

In this article, I’ll present the case for and against this stance, discuss some workarounds that might work for everyone, and throw in my two cents on what to include on LinkedIn.

 

As an Executive Resume Writer, I frequently have clients tell me they don’t want to limit themselves. Therefore, they ask for a resume that can be used for a variety of roles; they are looking for a way to transform their resume. Unfortunately, generic resumes often are quite diluted. Therefore, the reader is hard-pressed to determine how you are a good fit for a specific role.

It is great to be a jack-of-all-trades – but it is rare that a job posting calls for someone with these skills. Customizing your resume in a few key areas requires a bit of work. However, it will guide the reader to see how your skills align with a job posting.

It is never too late to pursue a new career. As an Executive Resume Writer, I can attest that returning to school after years in the workforce with the intent of using your new graduate or undergraduate degree to make a change is quite common! With the last semester looming and graduation on the horizon or in the rear view mirror, many have a dream role in mind but struggle with how to position themselves, and their new degree, on LinkedIn.

If it’s been longer than 5 years since you’ve dipped your toes in the job search waters, it’s important to understand that some key components of the job hunt have changed. As an Executive Resume Writer, I can attest that there’s more to it than refreshing your resume (even if you have your resume professionally written), making sure your LinkedIn is current (although that’s certainly an important part of it), and scouring online job boards.

In fact, spending most of your time applying online can land you in the ATS (applicant tracking system) black hole— from which many resumes never return. Not only will you walk away incredibly frustrated, it will likely prolong your job search.

It is critical to use social media (LinkedIn for most in the world of medical sales) to connect with your network and tap into opportunities. However, as an executive resume writer, I can attest that your resume remains THE DOCUMENT that forms the foundation of a well-planned and executed job search.

Here’s are three things you can do to give your resume or CV a competitive advantage:

#1 Articulate Your Value From the Top – Concisely

Recruiters usually have a lot on their plates. This makes for skim rather than in-depth reads…especially during the first few rounds. Your summary or branding statement at the top must quickly inform the reader:

The upside of a booming economy means hiring is stronger than ever. The downside? More folks are out there emboldened to test the job search waters. The bottom line? The job market is growing increasingly saturated, and as an executive (whether seeking an executive writer service or not), you must do a lot more in addition to speaking with a handful of recruiters to land interviews that are a good match for your skillset.

To get a foot in the door and boost the number of interviews that come along, executive job seekers must be ready to invest in some upfront sweat equity that, in reality, is not all that different from the strategies they employ to be successful in their roles.

You’ve probably noticed LinkedIn is in continuous flux, with tweaks to the interface and new features rolling out fairly regularly – often with little to no warning. To make thing even more complex, rollouts occur in waves so one user might have a new feature while the other is left waiting. For job seekers and for those who value protecting their professional brand, there are four new features I recommend becoming familiar with that by now should appear on the desktops of all users:

 

1. New Setting Protects Your Profile from Plagiarism

I’ve been fortunate to interview many successful career professionals as an executive resume writer throughout my career, and have had the opportunity to pick their brains about what worked (and what didn’t!) during their job searches. Common themes have emerged. Here’s a list of 4 things most would do differently if turning back time was an option. These tips will help you conduct a successful job search online and offline to get hired faster.

How to Conduct a Successful Job Search:

 

1. Figure Out What Roles You Want to Target

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