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Finding a new job and moving into a new role requires a well thought out strategy. Learn about what you should do and how to go about your job search and career transition.
 
 

Social and Business Networking
As we gaze at the bleak yet hopeful employment landscape, there is a temptation to withdraw from the executive job market. Surely no one is hiring yet. Why spend the time, money, and emotional expense of looking for a new executive position when headhunters are handling less assignments and employers are not filling openings?
 

 

Despite Economic Recession, Executive Jobs In Several Sectors Expected To Grow In 2009

Global Senior Executive Positions in Healthcare, Government, Pharma/Biotech and Natural Resources to be on the Rise.

The Rise of Outplacement Services
Images of executives filing out of corporate buildings with boxes of their possessions dominated the media in October and November 2008, with the collapse of Lehman Brothers being particularly poignant. These images, alongside interviews with recession victims, have installed job insecurity in executives throughout the world.



Suddenly the world outlook looks a little more promising.
Have we reached the proverbial tipping point? Malcolm Gladwell did us all a favour by coining that phrase.  Warren Buffet said only yesterday that the unprecedented fear and withdrawal of recent months needs to be replaced by confidence in the future. Franklin Roosevelt said  that 'the only thing we have to fear is fear itself'.

Using LinkedIn as an Executive Career Progression Tool - Part Two

LinkedIn is commonly used to “get to someone” in order to make a sale, form a partnership, or get a job. It works well for this kind of communication because it is an online network of more than 8.5 million experienced professionals from around the world representing 130 industries. Still, as a tool for executive job hunting and career management, LinkedIn is often underutilized. Read on for the second installment of the top ten ways to increase the value of LinkedIn as part of your executive job and career development strategy.


Using LinkedIn as an Executive Career Progression Tool - Part One

LinkedIn is commonly used to “get to someone” in order to make a sale, form a partnership, or get a job. It works well for this kind of communication because it is an online network of more than 8.5 million experienced professionals from around the world representing 130 industries. Still, as a tool for executive job hunting and career management, LinkedIn is often underutilized. Read on for the first installment of the top ten ways to increase the value of LinkedIn as part of your executive job and career development strategy.

The Executive Mobility Survey, conducted by the AESC from July 12th to October 15th 2007, investigates key factors driving senior executives to make job changes. In an effort to gauge the search field’s level of understanding of these motivating factors, the survey was posed to both executive level candidates, members of the AESC’s BlueSteps, and to AESC member search firms.

Respondents to this survey included 933 BlueSteps members and 152 AESC member firms. Of the BlueSteps respondents 502 are from North America, 278 are European, 96 are from Asia Pacific, 30 are from Central or South America, and the remaining 23 come from other parts of the world. Forty three percent of BlueSteps respondents are aged 45-54 and 38% are aged 35-44.