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BlueSteps recently hosted an #ExecCareer Chat on the topic of executive executive job search strategy, featuring Lindsay Bray Landsberg, Boyden Global Executive Search, Rainer Morita, BlueSteps Executive Career Services, and Kimberly Sernel, BlueSteps Executive Career Services.

Some of the questions asked included:

It’s difficult to define the precise formula for making it to the C-suite. Life, or rather a career for that matter, is not always a neatly defined “how to” project or a formulaic enterprise that offers guaranteed output solely based on relentless execution. There are twists and turns and variables that one has no control over that influence the final outcome. My attempt here is to capture observations based on seeing such movements over the years, which you can bear in mind as you plan to scale the wall.   
 

Not all job search methods are equally productive, especially at the executive level. Spend most of your job search time growing your network rather than searching job boards. Activities that increase your chances of referrals and connecting with the right executive search consultants will make you the most visible for executive jobs. Many executive positions are not even posted on job boards as they’re confidential or employers are simply weary of wading through a flood of resumes. 
 

Referrals

Changing industries can open up a broader range of opportunities for executives who want to reinvigorate a stalled career, seek to combine their skills and interests in a new arena, are stuck in a dying/declining sector, have limited options in their desired geographic location, or are impacted by the increased outsourcing of operations overseas.

Although product and industry knowledge are important to some companies in certain industries, it is possible to make a successful industry transition through a focused, systematic process—without having to reduce your compensation level. Unless a position requires industry-specific technical knowledge or contacts, you can build a clear case that will illustrate your ability to succeed in a new industry.

BlueSteps recently hosted a follow up #ExecCareer Chat on the topic of making the leap to CEO, featuring Cathy Logue, from Stanton Chase, and Jose Ruiz, from Alder Koten. To read part one, click here.

Some of the questions asked included:

You've built yourself a long career history after many years of hard work, and your resume/CV is packed full of your extensive experience. But if you haven’t been on the job hunt for a while, you might be out of touch with today’s resume/CV trends, and you might be worried about how all of those years of experience will be perceived by prospective employers.
 
Most importantly, you want to know how you can show your future employer that age isn't a factor—that you are on top of your industry and up-to-date in current technology.
 

This message is for the up and comers. The next generation. The about-to-bes. The replacers of the old guard. Yes, this article is for the millennials. Note: Even though the majority of executives come from an earlier generation, most of the advice here could also apply to an executive’s resume.

BlueSteps recently hosted an #ExecCareer Chat on the topic of career transition, featuring Rainer Morita, BlueSteps Executive Career Services, and Sally Stetson, Salveson Stetson Group.

Some of the questions asked included:

BlueSteps recently hosted an #ExecCareer Chat on the topic of making the leap to CEO, featuring Cathy Logue, from Stanton Chase, and Jose Ruiz, from Alder Koten.

Some of the questions asked included:

You’ve probably heard this comparison before: A job search is in essence a marketing campaign with you as the product. Your career communications tools are your marketing collateral, and your executive job search strategy equates to your marketing campaign. A smart campaign hones in on specific targets with specific marketing messages built around a specific career brand aligned with specific proof points.