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BlueSteps recently hosted an #ExecCareer Chat on the topic of CIO/CTO job search, featuring Stephen Van Vreede, from BlueSteps Executive Career Services.

Some of the questions asked included:

While many senior executives look within their industries for advancement opportunities, it’s a good practice to step back for a moment and look at the bigger picture: Are you in the right industry for your skills and aspirations? Do you want to keep working in banking, retail or consumer goods for the rest of your career? Or would you be better off moving into technology, manufacturing or distribution sector?

Switching industries can pay big dividends for a senior executive who lacks advancement opportunities in his or her current field or has been "downsized" by a recent employer. Regardless of your individual circumstances, shifting gears can provide an excellent opportunity to take your career to a higher level.

BlueSteps recently hosted an #ExecCareer Chat on the topic of executive job search strategies, featuring Per André Marum, from Panamera Executive Search, Kimberly Sernel, from BlueSteps Executive Career Services, and Sally Stetson, from Salveson Stetson.

Some of the questions asked included:

Ahead of his appearance at the AESC’s Global Conference in April, Joe Nocera, Partner at PwC, describes what boards are looking for to meet their cyber security needs.

How well equipped are the world’s largest companies to handle the threat of cyber security breaches today?

BlueSteps recently hosted an #ExecCareer Chat on the topic of expatriate job search, featuring Frank Therber, from Daubenspeck & Associates, LTD.

Some of the questions asked included:

This may seem obvious, but it bears repeating – honesty is the best policy. The executive job search process is difficult enough – you don’t want to get inches away from an offer, only to miss out on the role of a lifetime. Below are some of the factors you should consider when deciding what should and shouldn’t be disclosed to a potential employer.

Executive Job Search - Background ChecksNegative Behavior or Debt Show Up During a Background Check

Open board seats represent potential opportunities for past military leaders. But for many, the question is, “What are my chances? Will I get on a board?” This blog offers encouragement to veterans who seek board seats and challenges boards to go beyond their usual networks to consider military leaders for that next open board seat.

Opportunity Awaits

Every year, most public company boards add at least one new director. The way board hiring trends are going, it won’t be long until two new faces may be the new rule. This opening of the boardroom offers new hope for those hoping to get a board seat – including military veterans.

Every January, millions of us resolve to go on a diet. But by the time February rolls around, we are back to our old habits, reducing the likelihood of making a positive change in our lives. That's because losing weight and keeping it off requires a sustained strategy that includes eating healthier foods, reducing total caloric intake and increasing your exercise routine. Like many lifestyle changes, it's a matter of self-discipline, and being able to delay personal gratification for the sake of achieving long-term goals.

It’s true that there is no guaranteed path to obtaining an international work assignment. In an increasingly competitive global employment environment, finding the right position abroad can certainly be challenging. However, it’s not impossible with a well-thought-out executive job search strategy and persistence. Below are some suggestions to help you through the process.

Leverage the professional contacts you already possess

I left New York at the end of 2012 in support of my wife who landed a fantastic career opportunity in Seoul, Korea. I parted ways with the U.S. investment bank I had called home for five years and was proud to be a trailing spouse, ready to start the next, international chapter of my life. My wife and I knew that we were taking a tremendous risk to my career, but I did it voluntarily. The upside to my wife’s path was well worth it.  We also felt confident that my experience and background would enable me to find something comparable in Korea relatively quickly. How “easy” it would be – that was our fantasy; below was our reality: