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Learn about what the executive search process looks like. Keep up with trends and best practices to reach out to recruiters as well as learn more on how to advance your career or finding a new role.

Like many professions, the executive recruiting industry has developed its own specializations and distinctions. The differences between retained executive search and other types of recruitment can seem confusing and the differences unimportant. However, to people in the profession and those dealing with it, the differences are crucial.
 

EXECUTIVE SEARCH REVENUES RISE IN THIRD QUARTER
 
New AESC data finds increasing focus in C-level and senior executive assignments in 2013

With a fierce global war for talent on, executive recruiters are actively seeking out passive candidates worldwide for international executive posts. A common assumption being that the best performers are already being successful at work – not actively looking for jobs.

But once an executive is contacted by a recruiter about their interest in pursuing an interesting opportunity overseas, how do they know if the recruiter is really in a position to make things happen?

Here are six questions an executive can ask themselves when evaluating a recruiter proposing an international assignment:
 

The Peter Felix, AESC and BlueSteps President and CEO, recently had the opportunity to speak with Dr. Henry Wang, President of the China Global Talents Society, about current global executive search trends in China and the upcoming China Global Executive Talent Forum.


Peter Felix: Good morning, Henry, it’s a pleasure to talk to you this morning; you’re in Beijing, I’m in New York and look forward to our conversation this morning. Thank you for taking the time to speak with the AESC and BlueSteps about talent management and the shortage of executive talent in China.

The AESC and BlueSteps recently had the opportunity to speak with 5 top AESC member executive search consultants, about executive search in Germany. Interviews were conducted with Christine Stimpel, from Heidrick & Struggles, Klaus Hansen, from Odgers Berndtson, Thomas Becker, from Russell Reynolds Associates, Franco Parodi, from Parodi & Associates, and Richard Fudickar, from Boyden. Below is a sample of one of the expert Q&As with Klaus Hansen from Odgers Berndtson.
 

By now everyone in the executive search marketplace, whether search firm or candidate, is aware of LinkedIn. With 238 million names it is almost a foregone conclusion that many or most candidates on a short list will have a LinkedIn profile.

Most of Association of Executive Search Consultants (AESC) members when commenting on LinkedIn acknowledge that it is a very useful name generation tool. Some of the AESC's largest members even have significant contracts with LinkedIn to provide multi-license facilities to their research staff.

When economic markets collapsed in 2008, the retained executive-search industry slowed dramatically. According to the New York-based Association of Executive Search Consultants (AESC) trade group, world-wide industry revenues fell 32% in 2009 and hundreds of consultants left the field.

Today, industry revenues are again approaching their 2007 peak, but executive search itself has undergone changes that are important to both employers and candidates.

Second quarter global executive search industry data highlights even greater focus on the highest management positions.

You have been identified by a headhunter as a potential source or candidate and receive that all important phone call from a search firm. Are you prepared? Have you perfected your elevator pitch? How do you ensure you are not caught off guard, or worse, screened out of an executive search before you've even had a chance to prove yourself?
 
Make Yourself Available

The 2013 Mid-Year Executive Search Industry Global Outlook Report, by the Association of Executive Search Consultants (AESC), shows that 88% of executive search consultants hold a neutral to positive outlook at mid-year 2013 for the rest of the year ahead. Only 12% of search consultants harbor a negative view for July-December 2013.