Home

Candidates self destruct in many ways during interviews. But I’ve heard – and seen – more candidates kill their chances during interviews this one way than all others combined. This mayhem doesn’t just kill interviews, the poison can extend to phone interviews and written communication also.
It’s a deal killer … and it happens a lot. Many candidates just can’t seem to stop themselves.

As an observer or listener, it’s like seeing a train wreck that’s about to happen – it hasn’t happened yet, you can see that it’s inevitable, yet you’re powerless to stop the wreck from happening.

Ever get all excited for an interview, only to be frustrated that it didn’t go as well as planned? Maybe your experience wasn’t portrayed in its best light, or your many accomplishments weren’t valued.

It is very common to hear career coaches, hiring managers or executive recruiters advising candidates to use the CAR interview technique – in fact, I first heard about it from an AESC member search consultant at Russell Reynolds. But why is this particular interview technique so popular?

Recently I came across a frustrated executive job seeker, who had experienced some hiring brick walls due to lack of industry experience. The job seeker in question wished to switch industry and pointed out the number of transferable skills he had obtained throughout his career – asking why executive recruiters and hiring managers are pre-occupied with experience?

It is ironic how one can write a dynamite resume, prepare for interview questions, practice salary negotiation, and do thorough research to uncover companies hiring your type of talent, but not be prepared to clearly evaluate the offers when they come in.

My clients often express frustration after they’ve completed their interviews for a position they want. The common complaints include, “Why doesn’t the company call me back?” or “I feel like I have no power; all I can do is wait for an answer,” or “Can’t I do anything to make the employer say YES?”


Effective Interview Techniques for Senior Executive Positions

Your efforts have finally paid off—you’re scheduled to meet with an executive recruiter or hiring manager to discuss a job that’s a good fit for your experience, expertise, and career interests. But don’t relax yet! You can increase your chances of earning a second interview and, ultimately, a job offer by spending some time preparing for that interview.
 
Executive job interviewers taking notes
 

During an executive job search, succeeding during executive interviews is the final step in landing that ideal executive position. Not only is it a requisite for demonstrating your skills to others, the process of refining your interview technique will help provide focus to your executive job search and remind you of your key strengths.

1. Importance of Research

Many foreign-born executives who either come to the US to work or are looking for a new job while in the US, don’t fully grasp the US interview process. It is, as in many countries, multi faceted, but the steps involved can be difficult if not mastered ahead of time.