Home

When launching your executive job search campaign while employed, there are always a few concerns. The biggest concern is that your current employer might find out. Some consider this “disloyal” behavior, even if they themselves would have no issue with poaching an executive from a competitor.

A few companies have internal or unwritten policies that an employee (executive or otherwise) who is discovered searching for a new job should be replaced as soon as possible, rather than be stuck having to quickly fill a key position when that person gives notice. For this reason, if your job search is discovered, the company may start to seek your replacement, even if you haven’t announced you’re looking, much less leaving.

In-person networking events can cause apprehension for even the most experienced executives. However, attending such events can have a huge impact on your career trajectory, so it is vital that executives should make time for networking in their schedules.

Even if you are not actively seeking a new role, it is important to start building your network as soon as possible. The key to efficient networking has always been to build a network before you need one. It is vital to remember that networking should always be a mutually beneficial practice and you should try to have something to offer those you are seeking to connect with.

In this age of instantaneous communications and rapid sound bites, long gone is the luxury of correcting something said in haste. Today's proliferation of channels and technologies has completely obliterated any chance of a safety net. There is no place to hide. The old axioms we thought were destined for the dustbins of history now take on new purpose and vigor.

Much like a blind date, attending a networking event can bring up anxieties. Even the most experienced executive can have some apprehension about walking into an event alone and trying to integrate into groups of people and conversations. Since it is a fact that most jobs are found through networking, it is worth your time to avoid common missteps and hone your networking skills.

Stage One – Introductions

Being referred to a hiring manager by a trusted person increases an applicant’s odds of being hired 50–100X, according to Lou Adler, author of Performance-Based Hiring.
 
With odds like that, any job seeker would be foolish to ignore the power of networking. In fact, for an effective and efficient search, networking should be your primary strategy.
 
Not all executives believe this, however. I’ve heard lines like these countless times in my many years as a resume writer/career advisor:

BlueSteps recently hosted two #ExecCareer Chats on the topic of Leveraging LinkedIn for Networking, featuring Jane Anderson and Barbara Safani, BlueSteps Executive Career Services Coaches.
 
Some of the questions asked included:

BlueSteps recently hosted the #ExecCareer Chat: Jumpstart Your Social Media Networking Strategy, featuring Barbara Safani, from BlueSteps Executive Career Services.
 
Some of the questions asked included:

BlueSteps recently hosted the #ExecCareer Chat: Your Executive LinkedIn and Social Media Profiles, featuring BlueSteps Executive Career Services expert Stephen Van Vreede.
 
Some of the questions asked included:

LinkedIn has now made vast improvements to its increasingly popular Who’s Viewed Your Profile feature, helping users analyze their results and work towards increasing their visibility in specific areas and industries. LinkedIn has reported that nearly 80% of job candidates are found through networking today, so there has never been a better time to start building your own network!
 
Main Changes and How to Utilize Them:
 
1. What industries is my profile being viewed from?

Let’s take a look at the statistics. Over one billion people have Google+ accounts. LinkedIn has over 300 million people with accounts. Think of the massive reach of professionals in those two social media networks alone. How can you leverage these networks for your executive job search?