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Switching into a new role, industry, or function.
 

As a resume specialist, I certainly understand that it would be great to wake up thrilled at the prospect of going to work every day. However, for the majority this is simply not a reality – and that’s OK.

On the flip side, it’s NOT OK to wake up every day and dread going to work.

For many, if the pros of the role outweigh the cons, then the role is likely a decent fit – for now. But, these cons might be signs that it’s time for a new career.

Did you ever think to yourself… “Been in my industry what seems a life time, too many years in my current position, I’ve been there, I’ve done that?”

Or have you suddenly and unexpectedly found yourself between jobs? Perhaps fired, cut from the payroll but still a family to take care of? Or at best, you called it quits yourself?

Welcome to the Club either way. The question is, how do you avoid being a permanent member of this Club of Wannabes?  When I look back at 15 years of headhunting candidates for management positions in Thailand, I have learned the following:

No one wants to be labelled a "job hopper", but is it equally damaging to your executive career progression to say in one place for too long?

New skills and challenging experiences are often the product of a career transition. Changing roles can also lead to a faster compensation increase, and can prevent you from becoming pigeonholed into one set function or industry. During this recording, listen to executive career advisors share their knowledge on career transitions and how to know when to go.  

You have probably heard most executive jobs are either found through networking or by being "headhunted" by executive-level recruitment firms, also called search firms. Both leveraging your network and building relationships with a few executive recruiters in your industry are methods that can be highly effective for winning new opportunities. Both are without a doubt critical for executive-level professionals to include in their overall career management strategy. Both, however, do take considerable time — the results don’t happen overnight.

Sometimes hard work and dedication to your job can only get you so far. If you have a clear career goal, but are finding yourself unable to move past your current level to the C-Suite, it might be time to change strategy and gain more understanding of what it takes to become a C-level executive.

Career “Switchers” – professionals who are looking to make an industry or functional change (or both) – are on the rise. But making a significant change mid-career is tough. When faced with hiring bias, unanswered applications and frustrating rejections, many Switchers give up too soon, even when they KNOW they have what it takes to be successful in their new target role. Don't let this be you - persevere and get the job you want!

Let me present yourself one of the deadliest and yet often most easily neglected mistake you can do as executive in career transition: Having a big EGO. Let me show you three examples and the negative consequences of a big ego for job search success.

 

Mistake Number 1: “I can do it.”

Your resume tells who you are. Simply put, you are what you write, and not what you think you are. An executive maybe a worldwide SVP of Sales, but the resume presents you as a middle manager. You may be an industry-agnostic General Manager, but your resume makes you an automotive industry expert. You may rank high in an investment bank, but you fail to communicate your responsibility and 100 staff under you.

If you’re ready to make the transition to a new job or a new industry, a resume or CV revamp is imperative, and a vital document in your career marketing toolkit to pursue your new role.

However, beware, the most difficult resumes to write are those of career changers. Transitioning to a new career requires personal assessment and reinvention to create a clear, compelling marketing proposition for your target audience.

As we enter the holiday season, it is time for the annual ritual of New Year’s Resolutions, more intense for some & less intense for some others. Apart from weight loss, the quest for a new role typically ends up landing in the list of priorities! In this context, while speaking to many people on their goals for a new role in the coming year, I prepared the following outline, based on the advice many sought from me:

As a new executive, how do you ensure your success and your organization’s success? Don’t rely on the company to do it for you.

A company’s onboarding process often does not receive the same level of effort and attention as the hiring process. So be proactive and set yourself up for success by filling in the pieces your company may miss to ensure you understand the company culture, hierarchy, your team’s strengths and weaknesses, and the company’s organizational goals and potential challenges. onboarding