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A chief financial officer (CFO) is the senior executive responsible for managing the financial actions of a company. The CFO's duties include tracking cash flow and financial planning as well as analyzing the company's financial strengths and weaknesses and proposing corrective actions.Chief Financial Officer: Articles that are specifically about these roles or trends

In this topical article, financial services executives can find an overview of what omni-channel banking is, why it’s important and how to update their technology systems.
 

Omni-Channel Banking Defined

An omni-banking experience represents the leveraging of customer behaviors across all relevant banking channels, which provides the basis for a consistent, personalized banking transaction. Wherever there is a multi-step banking experience that is completed over time, each relevant channel needs to recognize what step the customer is in related to the transaction fulfillment process, and be able progress the multi-step process in a transparent fashion to the customer.
 

The Rational That Is Driving Customer Demand

BlueSteps recently hosted an #ExecCareer Chat on the topic of executive search and your CEO career, featuring Tom Fuller, from Epsen Fuller Group, Keith Pearson, from Pearson Partners International, and Luis Truchado, from Eurogalenus and AIMS International.

Some of the questions asked included:

My previous post discussed the C-suite Relationship Map, which I have based on the CFO Relationship Map I use in my executive coaching with Chief Financial Officers.  I have been working with this relationship map for the past few years.

I am fortunate to speak with hundreds of executives each year, in addition to those that I follow and track. Over the years, I have learned a lot about success, what works and what doesn’t, from these talented leaders.

One area that successful executives have in common is their ability to get the best out of their corporate relationships. No matter the discipline of the C-suite executive, their technical ability is just the base upon which they start having an impact on their organization. The CXO is not an island, but is integrated into an ecosystem that is mutually dependent. The success of any executive relies on others. Those who recognize, nurture and sustain successful corporate relationships are those that accomplish more.

BlueSteps recently hosted the #ExecCareer Chat: Executive Search and the CFO Position, featuring Stephen P. Konstans, Vice President, Pearson Partners International, Rick Cannellos, Senior Client Partner, Epsen Fuller Group, and Catherine Bell, BluEra Founder.
 
Some of the questions asked included:

A friend recommended this article to me recently that talked about how office workers in China are literally working themselves to death. Working on Wall Street can certainly feel that way in many ways (the highest highs come with the lowest lows), and with the news that a 21-year old intern working for Bank of America (BofA) collapsed and died last year after he worked until 6 am for three straight days (he also suffered from epilepsy, according the CNBC article), banks put forth explicit guidelines limiting the number of hours interns, and now first-year investment banking analysts, can work.
 

BlueSteps recently hosted the #ExecCareer Chat: Chief Financial Officers in Transition, featuring Samuel Dergel, from Stanton Chase International.
 
Some of the questions asked included:

BlueSteps chats with Samuel Dergel, Executive Search Consultant at Stanton Chase International, who recently published Guide to CFO Success.

Samuel Dergel, Stanton Chase InternationalFirst of all, thank you for taking the time to speak with the AESC and BlueSteps about the CFO role and your new book, Guide to CFO Success. Can you tell us about the work you do at Stanton Chase International?
 


Many senior financial executives spend so many hours on the job that actively managing their own careers takes low priority. This can be a costly mistake if there is a chance you might be at a crossroads within the next year or two. In the current business environment, this is frankly a possibility for just about everyone.

At times, HR executives can encounter a difficult path on their journey to the C-suite. The following strategies can be useful for HR executives who are interested in becoming a key part of their companies’ strategic organization.
 
1. Start with the Basics. Most executives know that the best way to move up in their career is to excel at their current position. By mastering the basics, such as contract negotiation strategies, an HR executive can quickly get noticed and move up the corporate ladder.