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Advice and tips on how to improve, update, edit your cover letter.
 

I see lots of resumes every week – some are sent in by my hiring team, some come to me from absolute strangers via LinkedIn & some come via referrals from friends & acquaintances.

Often, I have experienced a difference between the persona reflected in the resume, and the person you meet in reality. Based on my real-life experience, here’s my take on what C-level cover letters & resumes should look like: 

Executives can more effectively position themselves for new opportunities, and dramatically decrease time spent in-transition by ensuring that their three vital career documents are fully optimized and up-to-date. Executive resumes, LinkedIn profiles and cover letters form the cornerstone of any job search or career progression, so time should be invested in them to ensure your results are maximized.
 

executive_resume_optimization

Sending that first message to someone is a critical part of the job seeking process. The subject line needs to give the reader an interest in learning more and a desire to read the message. Candidates should consider: What is their mission? What is the most efficient way to achieve that mission? For many years, executives have tried to create the perfect formula for a message subject line, but there is no single solution. Three things to consider in creating an effective e-mail subject line are: creativity, relevance, and enticement.
 

No matter how much time or money you have invested into crafting that killer executive resume, if your cover letter does not make the grade, it is unlikely that recruiters or potential employers will be motived to open your attached career document.

The importance of having a well-written, persuasive and professional cover letter cannot be overstated, but it is something that many senior-level executives struggle with. Since there's such a short amount of space to make a positive first impression and explain why you are suited to the role, BlueSteps has provided three simple steps to help you on your way.
 

In my days as a hiring agent, I saw my fair share of applicants who were befuddled by the cover letter vs. E-note conundrum. As I opened their emails, I could almost see them—brows furrowed, hesitating to click “send”—puzzled by what on earth to write in the email, since they were also attaching a cover letter.

Nearly every time I talk with executives about their job search and the career documents they need the long-standing question comes up…

Do I really need a cover letter and is it really being read? executive_job_search_cover_letter

Some executives will tell me that they personally don’t read candidate cover letters (the reasons: they are usually not well written, sound canned, not tailored, etc.). Others will tell me that they do read them—some before they read the resume and others after they read the resume, looking for consistency between the two documents and interest in their company and the position.

 
 
 
Executive Question - Cover Letters

With so many Executive Search firms and so many recruitment and job sites offering advice on "how to write the perfect cover letter", it is difficult to really gauge just what the core fundamental rules of writing a cover letter are, particularly when there is so much conflicting evidence. What is the advice of the AESC, and those experts who consult Bluesteps members?