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I’ve worked full-time as a executive resume/CV writer since 1981. I can’t even begin to calculate how many resumes/CVs I’ve written, but it’s in the thousands!

After 30 years, I know things about resume/CV writing that most job seekers don’t - I’m sure you can say the same about your profession. There are always "insider secrets" that only people who work in those professions know because that knowledge comes from years of experience. In this article, I’m going to share some of those things with you: resume/CV writing strategies and actions that you can use to strengthen your resume/CV and give yourself a competitive edge.

For many executives, especially those who have been in their current position for several years, the answer to this question is often out of memory.

But, with the rise of new executive searches in many sectors, according to recently released AESC data, now is the time to make sure your executive resume/CV is up-to-date and effectively written.

When working with executive search consultants, if a suitable opportunity arises, your resume will be immediately requested, leading to missed opportunities for those who are underprepared.

“Omit needless words,” wrote William Strunk Jr. in 1918’s timeless writing guide The Elements of Style. “A sentence should contain no unnecessary words…for the same reason that a drawing should have no unnecessary lines and a machine no unnecessary parts.”

That’s good advice, and a key element in making an effective executive resume for your job search. Resume language should be tight and concise because:

The key to an executive resume that gets results is writing one that is targeted toward the type of position you are seeking. But what if you have more than one position you are qualified for and interested in?
 
A sales/business development executive may be equally qualified for an executive role in Business Development or Product Management. Or an operations executive may want to target a General Manager role, while keeping the door open for a more specialized role in Supply Chain Management. An IT executive with an operations background may want to be considered for either a CIO or COO job.
 

When was the last time you edited and updated your executive resume? Carefully reworking your resume can be a daunting task that many are guilty of pushing to the bottom of their executive career to-do list. It’s difficult to know what to include, where to start, or how your writing will be perceived by executive recruiters and future employers alike.
 
As your most influential self-marketing document, here is a checklist of factors to consider when reworking your resume:

Showcasing your Unique Selling Point: What skills do you have that will make you stand out from the numerous other executives applying for the same roles?

Age discrimination: It’s illegal, but we all know it happens. You can’t change your birthdate, but you can take steps to prevent age discrimination during your job search. A good technique is to give your resume a virtual shot of Botox with a QR code.

QR codes are small, two-dimensional squares that can be scanned with a smartphone to direct the user to a website containing additional information. You’ve probably seen them on advertisements – they’re showing up on everything from ketchup bottles to movie posters.

As Robert Frost might say were he alive today,” C-level executives go down the road less traveled. And that makes all the difference.” And, recognizing that the C-level executive does travel on a different plane than other senior management, therefore, they need to have a resume that stands out above. So how does a C-level resume look? What needs to be included? What needs to be excluded?  Here are the top seven tips to lay the groundwork and get you started.

1. Contact information

Although writing a resume is a very personal experience, it pays to follow some basic guidelines in order to increase the likelihood of potential employers taking your application to the next step. The following ten points are collected from top expert sources and should assist in making your resume clear, interesting and impactful.

I don’t know what it is about resumes. People seem to get so caught up in what they think a resume “should” be that they overlook what a resume can be…an entree to a new role, a new career, a new life. Some people seem to treat their resumes like they are their tax returns…break a rule and get penalized; enter information in a different place and suffer the consequences…it really doesn’t need to be so formulaic…and it shouldn’t be. A good resume is a representation of your strengths, your passion, your dreams…all wrapped up into a compelling message of value. Here are ten mistakes I see people make when writing resumes and some tips for how to avoid these pitfalls.

If you’re applying, or planning to apply, to executive jobs overseas, you may have asked yourself these questions: